2016 Junior Salmon Auction

Mark your calendars! On May 26st the Vernonia Hands On Art Center, the local non-profit arts and heritage support group, presents the eighth annual Jr. Salmon Auction.

salmon art

salmon art

A fundraiser for the Vernonia Schools arts program, the auction features the amazing salmon creations of Vernonia art students. The students are supplied with blank pressboard salmon on which to craft their own unique visions. In addition to salmon, students have worked their magic on small furniture items that will also be included in the auction.

Beginning at 7:00PM in the VHS Commons, the salmon will be auctioned off with a minimum starting bid of $10.00. Proceeds from the auction support Vernonia School Arts, Scholarships, and Hands On Art programs. Over $10,000 has been donated to the arts programs to date!

The doors open at 6:30. Enjoy live music performed by students under the direction of Matthew Urban, visit the Band Boosters for a bite to eat, and chat with Vernonia’s talented young artists while you browse their creations. Be sure to sign up at the bidder’s table and be ready to go at 7:00!

Watch for previews of artwork and reminders on Facebook. For more information, contact Diana Peach at peachlee123@gmail.com or check the webpage at http://www.vernoniahandsonart.org.

The Good Ol’ Days – March 1914

diaryFrom Virgil Powell’s Diary

by Tobie Finzel

Virgil Powell was a long-time resident who had a farm somewhere in the Upper Nehalem Valley between Natal and Pittsburg.  Each year from 1906 until 1955, he kept a diary with a brief entry almost every day of his activities.  He noted what he did on the farm that day, what the weather was, if he worked in the woods or delivering mail, and what entertainments he attended. In the 1960s, then-curator John Stofiel transcribed the diaries to typewritten pages; both the original diaries and the transcriptions are kept the museum.

Here’s what Virgil wrote during the changeable weather of March 1914, his original spelling intact:

Saturday, Feb. 15:  Carried the mail to Mist.  Got to Mist at 11 A.M.  Grange day at Natal.  Pretty fair day but rained after I got home.  Had a fine time down at the store talking basket social for next Saturday night.

Saturday, Feb. 22.  Carried the mail down to Mist.  Got to Mist at 10 A.M.  Left Mist at 1 P.M.  Got home at 2.25.  Stayed home till 3.10 then started for the doings at Vernonia at 4.45.  From Mist to Vernonia 3 hours.  Had a deuce of a time.  Did not start home till 7 A.M.  Good fine day.

Tuesday, Feb. 25.  Sawed wood all day.  Shot at some salmon in the afternoon but did not kill any.  Cloudy and looks very much like rain.  Received a postal from Florence Williams.

Monday, March 16: Plowed a piece down by the river for potatoes and finished 4:30. Some peddilars here over night. Bright and fine all day.

Tuesday, March 17: Plowed the piece back of orchard by the river. Dave & Booth were here for dinner. Awful warm all day. Inez & I went over to Elliott place and got some cattle out in evening.

Wednesday, March 18: Went over to Elliott place and plowed all day for Bill Brown. Awful hot all day.

Saturday, March 21: Plowed over on the Elliott place all day. Very good all day. Ed. Webster & Kelly were here for dinner.

Wednesday, March 24: Built some fence over across the river. Snowed and rained all day and was a terrible bad day. Went over to Elliott place in afternoon and got Chief.

Friday, March 27: Took a sow up to the boar at Tuckers. Started up at 8 and got home 12:45 P.M. Snowed and stormed terrible all day.

 

Depression-era Reminiscences from Bob New, VHS 1947

During the Great Depression of the 1930s, jobs were almost nonexistent. The Oregon-American mill didn’t reopen until 1936, and Bob remembers that men would show up at the gate of the re-opened Oregon-American Lumber Company and stand around each morning, hoping they might be hired for a job, any job. There was a man in Vernonia who walked each day from the top of Corey Hill to the mill for many weeks, bringing his lunch in case someone didn’t show up for work and he could get a day’s wages. He eventually did get a coveted permanent job in 1938.

A 1934 Vernonia Eagle article listed the forty young men from the Vernonia area who were stationed at the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camp near Mist. There were many Depression-era programs established to help address the widespread unemployment; the CCC was designed to put young men to work on public projects including forest fire suppression. They received lodging, meals and a paycheck – most of which had to be sent home to help their families – in exchange for their work. The article noted that these local men were lucky to be stationed so near their homes as this was not often the case.

Heirloom quality woodworking

A quiet garage at the end of Adams Ave is the point of creation 130213_Studio_Shoot_Boxes_0005-Editfor some incredible wooden furniture120909_Sean's Tables_0050 and useful objects. First noticed in 2012 by the Oregonian while at the Scappoose Farmers Market, Cascade Architectural Woodworking has been steadily building a solid reputation for high quality craftsmanship.

CAWW is a true family business. Sean MacComb and his father Alan have been working together for over ten years now, most of that time with Sean’s brother Doug. They specialize in cabinet work, but have discovered that they also want to put their work into as many hands as possible.

This means cutting boards, cribbage boards, coffee 110320_Sean's tables - reload_0155-2-Edittables and much more are what occupy idle hands between cabinet jobs. Without a retail 120909_Sean's Tables_0080-Editfront, CAWW has mostly been discovered by word of mouth, although they currently have a regular presence at the Vernonia Open Air Market. Alan can be reached at alanmaccomb@frontier.com and Sean can be reached at 503-369-7317, or simply stop by market on Adams Ave on Saturdays 10-2pm.130822_Cribbage Boards_0002

Airbrush Art by Erika Paleck

 

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I grew up in an artistic family.  When I was a teenager, I was waiting at the DMV office where there was a beautiful airbrushed wall mural of cars from ‘30’s and 40’s in a beach scene.  I was immediately enchanted, not only by the hyper-realism of the chromed bumpers and shiny paint colors, but by the subtleties of the seabirds and colors in the sky, clouds, and sand.

unnamed (1)I didn’t learn to airbrush until I was over fifty, and my work tends to the dreamlike—almost something half-remembered after awakening.  I’m creating scenes with liquid music, using symbols and scenes that resonate in ways for which I have no words.  I know that a piece is completed the same way that I know I will love a song after first hearing it; there is a knowing, but not from the mind.

IMG_1020I’ve heard stories from people who wear my shirts about how they become their favorite shirts.  The beauty of airbrushing on clothing is that it will outlast your shirt while getting softer.  You can cut it out and frame it later if you want.  It’s art you wear over your heart.

IMG_0793Currently my work is available at the Vernonia Open Air Market during about half the Saturday events through Salmon Festival the first weekend of October.  Otherwise contact me at: epaleck@gmail.com  or 503-704-5970.

More examples of airbrush art:

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Acrylic Paintings by Randal Harvey

Red Dog 003Vernonia artist Randal Harvey worked a number of jobs over her lifetime. It wasn’t until her husband and she moved to the East Bay from San Francisco to help take care of aging parents that she had the time to get back to what she have always loved – Art.

“I have always loved arts and crafts.  I love color and the interplay of colors. I was first drawn to stained glass because of the vivid colors. After a few years I decided to begin painting; it seemed a natural progression.”

She started with watercolors under a delightful teacher, Pat Strout. She also took classes in California Impressionist Painting with George Holmes and completed a short stint with Mark Jezierny, who showed her the effects of Light and Shadow, and Perspective and Grids. Then she met two incredible artists (and teachers) to whom she says she owes so much: Gary Bergren and Margaret Bromstrom.

“Gary hammered into my head the elements that make a good painting:  The A, B, C’s and all the rules and reg’s of how to paint.  His portrait class, ‘Creating an Illusion,’ changed how I paint.  He taught me how to listen to a critique without my ego getting in the way.  He said to me once that you have to know the rules before you can break them successfully.  He was right of course.  He was and still is a wonderful and giving teacher, and just a plain fantastic person.

Red Dog 002“Margaret Bromstrom taught me to be free and brave with my painting, and offered the gift of time to do so.  I spent over two years with Margaret and a little over one year with Gary.”

Randal started with watercolor, still likes the medium and does it occasionally.  She tried oil, but discovered she was allergic to it!  So, she now paints in acrylic.  “With all the moisture in the air, the Pacific Northwest is a great place to paint with acrylic. I can keep my sponge palette workable for up to a month and, on occasion, longer.  Really!”

She describes her style, if forced to put a name to it, as somewhere between Realism and Surrealism.  “I’ve tried impressionism, but my style and colors seem to end up more realistic and dark.  I’m still evolving. Who knows what the future holds.”

Red Dog 001Her work covers a range of subjects including animal portraits and a “Vernonia Series.” The series includes: “Dogwood Blossoms on Texas Avenue, Vernonia, Oregon,” “Treasures from Julie’s Garden: ‘Beets and Squash’, Vernonia, Oregon” and “Christmas Pomegranate from Sentry Market, Vernonia, Oregon”.  She currently has nine in the series, with more in planning stages.  How many will be in the “Vernonia Series? She has no idea.

Randal loves and is influenced by many artists: “Rembrandt, Gainsborough, Vermeer–I love the darkness vs. light of their portraits. John Singer Sargent, whose brush work just blows me away – so loose up close, but stand back and it’s magic how he makes it come together.  Salvador Dali because his body of work just sings. Anything from the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Dante Rossetti being one of my favs, and John William Waterhouse, who some say isn’t a Pre-Raphaelite, but I say he is, so there.  And I can’t leave out Henri Rousseau, another of my favorites.”

Before closing this, Randal added, “I love seeing the work of the young artists in town and want to see more, please.”

The Good Ol’ Days – February 1908

diaryFrom Virgil Powell’s Diary

by Tobie Finzel

Virgil Powell was a long-time resident who had a farm somewhere in the Upper Nehalem Valley between Natal and Pittsburg.  Each year from 1906 until 1955, he kept a diary with a brief entry almost every day of his activities.  He noted what he did on the farm that day, what the weather was, if he worked in the woods or delivering mail, and what entertainments he attended. In the 1960s, then-curator John Stofiel transcribed the diaries to typewritten pages; both the original diaries and the transcriptions are kept the museum.  Here’s what Virgil wrote in February 1908:

Saturday, Feb. 15:  Carried the mail to Mist.  Got to Mist at 11 A.M.  Grange day at Natal.  Pretty fair day but rained after I got home.  Had a fine time down at the store talking basket social for next Saturday night.

Saturday, Feb. 22.  Carried the mail down to Mist.  Got to Mist at 10 A.M.  Left Mist at 1 P.M.  Got home at 2.25.  Stayed home till 3.10 then started for the doings at Vernonia at 4.45.  From Mist to Vernonia 3 hours.  Had a deuce of a time.  Did not start home till 7 A.M.  Good fine day.

Tuesday, Feb. 25.  Sawed wood all day.  Shot at some salmon in the afternoon but did not kill any.  Cloudy and looks very much like rain.  Received a postal from Florence Williams.

Open Air Market Potluck!

On Saturday January 17th the Open Air Market is hosting an informational potluck to kick off a recruiting drive for the 2015 season. The Market runs June through early October and features farm fresh produce from around the Vernonia area.

In past years the market has included locally made crafts and other goods and has been located at different locations throughout Vernonia. Without a permanent home, the market has relied on advertising and word of mouth to bring in vendors and customers.

While 2015 will not bring a permanent home to the market, it is hoped that new developments on the old school site will include a suitable place for the market. With the possibility of new features and a new home, the market managers are seeking guidance from the community.

At 1 pm on January 17th they welcome anyone interested in the future of the market to join them at the Grange building on the corner of Washington and North streets, across from the Vernonia Christian Church. Please bring a small dish of your choice to share.

Following the meal, attendees will be encouraged to let their voices be heard. A short history of the market will be followed by a question and answer session. Everyone is invited and the managers are especially interested in hearing from vendors and public who have been unable to participate in the market, but desire to do so.

Interested parties may contact Rachel or Bill Langmaid with questions or to RSVP. They can be reached at Rachel@rangelights.com, bill@rangelights.com, or by calling 503-429-0438.